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Edited by on June 20 2011 at 8:59 AM

Twas a sad sad weekend in the world of music. The Big Man responsible for the phenomenally ’80s sax solos on Lady Gaga‘s Edge of Glory and Hair passed away on Saturday of a stroke at 69. Now, little monsters might recognize him most from the Edge of Glory music video that was just released on Thursday 6/16 (which now has about 6 and a half million views), but most of the world will remember Clarence Clemons as the saxophonist for Bruce Springsteen and E Street Band, since the very beginning. Springsteen fans are now tuning into Gaga to hear his last ever performances, his last live show ever being with Mother Monster on American Idol. Read through to find out how Gaga got Clemons to play for her, and watch him on the Edge of Glory.

Clarence Clemons Dies on The Edge of GloryOn 4:00 PM on a Friday back in January, Clemons received the call that Lady Gaga wanted him to play on a her new album. He replied saying which days he was available. But no, that’s not how the Haus of Gaga conducts business, “No, she needs you in New York City right now!”. Clemons, being a self proclaimed Gaga-ite, he hopped on a plane from Florida and raced to the studio, where he met Lady Gaga for the first time.

She wanted Hair to have this Springsteen vibe. ”She said ‘we’ll put the tape on and you just play,’” Clemons says. “She said to me, ‘Play from your heart. Play what you feel.’ It was all very pure.”

He’s on that entire track, but just epically solos in Edge of Glory. And thus his stoop sitting cameo in the video will be watched forever.

RIP Clarence Clemons. May the Big Man be playing the big horn in the sky now.

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Story by Jessica Lapidos

I impart my daily love of light layering, thick-as-thieves platforms and undiscovered fashionable gems. I love to turn a phrase, and in truth I'm a designer at werq.